231 Front Street, Lahaina, HI 96761 [email protected] 808.123.4567

Tag: 上海夜网WW

Will the Fed hike rates? It’s all over but the Yellen

first_imgby: Brian J. O’ConnerA few years ago, I was dispatched to cover a speech by then-Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. Although the topic listed was listed in the Physician’s Desk Reference under “heavy narcotics,” my presence was required, “just in case he makes some news.”No, no, no, no, no, campers. Nooooo. The Federal Reserve chief is NOT in the business of making news, because if that happens, the financial markets are guaranteed to react by going (and allow me to employ a highly technical financial term here) “kerflooey.”What the Fed head does is “signal” the central bank’s eventual direction. Since the Fed’s main interest rate has been sitting at zero for seven years, signaling a rise should be as easy as imitating a South Florida retiree: Hit the blinker switch while doing 36 mph in the left lane of the Interstate and leave it on for the next 107 exits. Instead, current Chair Janet Yellen has signaled her ever-loving heart out by every means short of reviving the Pony Express. I mean, the woman even changed her ring-tone to “Message in a Bottle.”So when the Fed removed the word “patient” from its policy statement Wednesday to signal — once again — that rates would rise, what happened? Investors were so stunned that they sent stocks up by more 1.2 percent and hit the 10-year Treasury bond with its biggest one-day decline since October. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

3 characteristics you need to succeed

first_imgSuccess doesn’t look the same through everyone’s eyes. For some, success looks like a money bin full of gold coins that you can swim in. Okay maybe that’s just Scrooge McDuck. But money isn’t how everyone sees success. Some see success as happiness. Some see success in leaving their mark on the world around them. There are a lot of characteristics that can affect your level of success, but here are three that may be the most important…You have to have drive: If you don’t have the desire to be successful, you’ll never reach your goals. Think about what’s important to you and how much you want to achieve it. If you’re lacking the drive for what you’ve always considered “success”, maybe you’ve changed. Figure out what you really want and go get it.You have to believe in yourself: Henry Ford once said “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t … you’re right.” You’ll never reach your destination if you don’t believe in yourself. Whether it’s a work goal or a personal goal, surround yourself with supportive people who want to see you succeed. The looking-glass self is a concept coined by sociologist Charles Horton Cooley which says that people develop their concept of self by seeing how they’re perceived by others. Think about the people around you. Are they helping or hurting your chances at success?You have to be persistent: Success isn’t easy. Well maybe for a Kardashian, but to the rest of us, it takes a lot of hard work. And we all know that hard work isn’t easy. There will be roadblocks that get in your way. There will be times when you feel like giving up and throwing in the towel. If you want to achieve the kind of success that your heart truly desires, you have to keep fighting for it. The old proverb says “if you fall down 7 times, get up 8.” And I know what you’re thinking … that math doesn’t add up. Hey I’m with you. But the point is, every time you’re feeling down, you’ve got to take Curtis Mayfield’s advice and “Keep on Keeping On.” 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

Kilmartin takes Portfolio tally to three

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

New Zealand marriage rates lowest since 1960s, new data reveals

first_imgNZ Herald 5 May 2020Family First Comment: “Family First NZ has issued a statement citing a correlation between a decline in marriage rates and an impact on children and families. It warns the drop in marriage rates could have a negative social impact on children, according to recent reports on child abuse and family structure. “The statistics are clear. Children being raised by their married biological parents are by far the safest from violence – and so too are the adults.””Marriages are at an all-time low in New Zealand, new data shows – and it’s not the Covid-19 lockdown that has fewer couples tying the knot these days.The number of marriages in New Zealand last year dropped to its lowest level since 1960, according to a Statistics New Zealand release today.Population indicators manager Tehseen Islam said that last year 19,071 New Zealand couples celebrated marriage or civil union.Though that may sound like a fair whack of white dresses and wedding cakes, “This is down from 20,949 in 2018, and from 27,201 at its peak in 1971.”As in the past few decades, 72 per cent of marriages in 2019 were first marriages for both partners.Islam said the increasing population had led to declining marriage rates.Only 10 couples per 1000 people eligible to marry (unmarried people 16 and over) were married last year – less than half the rate of 30 years ago.Family First NZ has issued a statement citing a correlation between a decline in marriage rates and an impact on children and families. It warns the drop in marriage rates could have a negative social impact on children, according to recent reports on child abuse and family structure.“The statistics are clear. Children being raised by their married biological parents are by far the safest from violence – and so too are the adults.”READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=12329641Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more